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UN-NGLS launches Advancing Regional Recommendations Post-2015 Consultation Report

Posted on September 30, 2013 at 11:15 AM Comments comments (0)

UN-NGLS is pleased to announce the publication of its report Advancing Regional Recommendations for the Post-2015 Development Agenda, the synthesis of a four-month consultation conducted in writing and via teleconferences with 120 regional civil society networks. The report can be downloaded here [pdf].

The consultation, launched on 31 May 2013, gathered critical analysis from civil society on the UN post-2015 development agenda. This initiative was conducted in partnership with the Post-2015 Development Planning Team of the Executive Office of the Secretary-General, and with support from the UN Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund and the Ford Foundation.

UN-NGLS has synthesized the findings according to four main objectives for the post-2015 development agenda, which surfaced through clear convergence of priorities identified by regional civil society networks:

* Rebalance power relations for justice

* Fulfill human rights and overcome exclusion

* Ensure equitable distribution and safe use of natural resources

* Establish participatory governance, accountability and transparency

Section I of this report - Regional Convergences - presents a summary of the principal civil society recommendations for achieving each of these four objectives, representing expert analysis received from all regions during the consultation. Sections II-VI provide detailed reports of the findings from each region, organized according to the four main objectives that were identified.

More information is available here.

Innovation at the heart of ECOSOC

Posted on July 1, 2013 at 3:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Innovation at the heart of ECOSOC

The 2013 High-level Segment of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) is taking place on 1-4 July in Geneva. The Secretary-General’s report emphasizes that science, technology, innovation and culture are critical to the achievement of the MDGs and a successful transition to sustainable development. A Thunderclap campaign running since April helped youth bring their voices to the world’s leaders.

 

As the participants of the 2013 High-level Segment of ECOSOC were getting ready in Geneva last week, hundreds of Twitter users were signing-up to share a special tweet with all their followers on 1 July. This campaign, called “Thunderclap” aimed at bringing youth voices to the ECOSOC high-level segment.

 

“Investing in youth will enable us to solve sustainable development challenges such as poor education, lack of access to health care, high unemployment, violence, conflicts and extremism. This involves reaching out, listening to and learning from young people”, said Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon in a video message to promote the campaign, a week before the opening of the High-Level Segment.

 

With a call to “Innovate your Future”, young people have been encouraged to sustain the planet and ask the world leaders at ECOSOC to help. By sharing a single tweet, Twitter users from all over the world and from all backgrounds showed their support to empower youth. “At the United Nations, we believe that young people have the energy and ideas we need to change the world”, added the Secretary-General in his message.

 

Science, technology, innovation and culture for sustainable development

 

The ECOSOC Substantive Session is taking place from 1 to 25 July. It is divided in 5 Segments, a High-level Segment, which opens the session during the first week, a Coordination Segment, an Operational Activities Segment, a Humanitarian affairs Segment and a General Segment.

 

As part of the High-Level Segment, the theme of this year’s Annual Ministerial Review (AMR) is “Science, technology and innovation (STI) and culture for promoting sustainable development and the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.” These fields are presented as enablers for sustainable development and important elements of the post-2015 development agenda.

 

STI and culture significantly impact each of the three pillars of sustainable development – economic, social and environmental. STI drives the dynamic transformation of economies through productivity growth, which influences economic growth. Over time, economic growth fueled by innovations in science and technology can increase social cohesion, stability, and democratic governance while also increasing energy efficiency, reducing waste, mitigating climate change and embarking on sustainable development pathways. Culturally-based, local and indigenous knowledge as well as skills and endogenous know-how are core resources for coping with climate change, preventing biodiversity loss and ensuring environmental sustainability.

 

Five regions to report on Innovation for Development

 

The High-Level Segment will benefit from the reports of five regional consultations conducted in preparation for the AMR in Western Asia, Latin, Asia and the Pacific, Africa and Europe, all focusing on Science and Technology for Development.

 

The High-level Segment will also include National Voluntary Presentations from France, Nigeria, Peru, Thailand and Viet Nam, who will showcase their national reports on STI and culture and their experiences in promoting sustainable development and achieving the MDGs. It will also host several panel discussions and a thematic debate on the contribution of the Economic and Social Council to the elaboration of a Post-2015 development agenda.

 

The High-Level Segment will be opened by H.E. Mr. Néstor Osorio, President of ECOSOC. Also addressing the Council during its opening ceremony will be Mr. Ban Ki-moon, Secretary-General, H.E. Mr. Vuk Jeremić, President of the General Assembly, and H.E. Mr. Ueli Maurer, President of the Swiss Confederation

 

Coordination to promote employment and decent work for all

 

Organized on 5-9 July, the Coordination Segment will focus on following up to the 2012 Ministerial Declaration on “Promoting productive capacity, employment and decent work to eradicate poverty in the context of inclusive, sustainable and equitable economic growth at all levels for achieving the Millennium Development Goals” and to the International Conference on Financing for Development.

 

There will be a dialogue with the executive secretaries of the regional commissions on the theme of “Regional perspectives on the post-2105 development agenda”. In addition, the annual overview report of the UN system Chief Executive Board for Coordination (CEB) will be presented to the Council. The Secretary-General’s report on “the role of the United Nations system in promoting productive capacity, employment and decent work to eradicate poverty in the context of inclusive, sustainable and equitable economic growth at all levels for achieving the Millennium Development Goals” will provide the background analysis for the debate. In addition, the Segment will also feature a session on financing for development.

 

A resolution to monitor and implement the QCPR

 

The Operational Activities Segment, hold from 10-12 July, will focus on progress in implementing the General Assembly 67/226 resolution on the Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review of UN system’s operational activities (QCPR). The resolution adopts several important reforms measures with an aim to enhance the relevance, coherence, effectiveness and efficiency of UN operational activities for development.

 

The reports of the Secretary-General show that the UN system has taken some action in implementing the QCPR resolution. At the same time, some time-bound reform measures require urgent action. In particular, the UN development system needs to advance vigorously on several fronts, in particular harmonization of rules and regulations that govern business operations. At the end of the segment, a resolution is expected to be adopted which will provide further guidance on the monitoring and implementation of the resolution.

 

A Humanitarian Fair

 

The Humanitarian Affairs Segment (15-17 July) provides an essential forum where Member States, humanitarian organizations and other relevant counterparts discuss the challenges, opportunities and activities related to the strengthening of the coordination of emergency humanitarian assistance of the United Nations. The theme this Segment will be “The future of humanitarian affairs: towards greater inclusiveness, coordination, interoperability and effectiveness”; and it will convene two panel discussions.

 

The first panel discussion will focus on how humanitarian and development actors must work in ways that seek to reduce and manage the risks posed to people and communities vulnerable to humanitarian crises and the impacts of global challenges. The panel on “Promoting humanitarian innovation for improved response” will focus on how the humanitarian system can create an enabling environment for innovation and how it can ensure the identification and integration of innovations that address operational challenges and opportunities.

 

For the first time this year, a Humanitarian Fair will showcase, in the corridors of the Palais des Nations, how innovation can contribute to humanitarian response in more than 20 booths from various UN and NGO partners, representatives of the civil society, as well as regional organizations and the private sector.

 

General Segment to review reports of subsidiary bodies

 

At the General Segment (18-25 July), the Council will review the reports of its subsidiary bodies and of other UN entities working in the economic and social fields. These bodies include the Council’s functional commissions, regional commissions, expert and ad hoc bodies. It will also consider the report of its Ad Hoc Advisory Group on Haiti and a report of the Secretary General on South Sudan.

 

A number of system-wide thematic issues will be reviewed, among them, the mainstreaming of a gender perspective into all policies and programmes in the UN system, the Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and the report of the UN inter-agency task force on tobacco control.

 

The world is making big strides towards achieving the MDGs

Posted on July 1, 2013 at 3:55 PM Comments comments (0)

The world is making big strides towards achieving the MDGs

 

Several important targets of the Millennium Development Goals have or will be met by the 2015 deadline, but progress in many areas is far from sufficient, according to this year’s Millennium Development Goals Report launched today by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

 

“The Millennium Development Goals have been the most successful global anti-poverty push in history,” Mr. Ban said. “The MDGs have proven that focused global development objectives can make a profound difference.” The eight goals were agreed by all countries as an outgrowth of the UN Millennium Summit in 2000.

 

The analysis in this report, based on a wide range of statistics, shows that the actions of national governments, the international community, civil society and the private sector are coalescing in the achievement of many of the MDGs. At the same time, many items on the agenda remain incomplete. Redoubled efforts are urgently needed, in particular in regions most behind to jumpstart advancement and achieve maximum gains. The report also reveals that our attention needs to focus on disparities across geographical areas and social groups. The results of this report give us a clear indication where our efforts must be directed in the days remaining before the 2015 deadline.

 

The Millennium Development Goals Report is an annual assessment of global and regional progress towards the Goals. It is produced by the Statistics Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs and reflects the most comprehensive, up-to-date data and analysis compiled by over 27 UN and international agencies.

 

Important MDG targets already met or within close reach

The proportion of people living in extreme poverty has been halved at the global level and the world reached the poverty reduction target five years ahead of schedule. About 700 million fewer people lived in conditions of extreme poverty in 2010 than in 1990. Also, MDG drinking water target was met five years ahead of the target date with over 2 billion people having gained access to improved sources of drinking water since 1990.

 

Over 200 million slum dwellers benefitted from improved water sources, sanitation facilities, durable housing or sufficient living space between 2000 and 2010, thereby exceeding the 100 million MDG target. Given reinvigorated efforts, the target of halving the percentage of people suffering from hunger by 2015 appears to be within reach.

 

Remarkable gains have also been made in the fight against malaria and tuberculosis. Mortality rates from malaria fell by more than 25 per cent globally between 2000 and 2010. Between 1995 and 2011, a cumulative total of 51 million tuberculosis patients were successfully treated, saving 20 million lives.

 

Accelerated progress and bolder action needed in many areas

 

Environmental sustainability is under severe threat, demanding a new level of global cooperation: The growth in global greenhouse gases is accelerating, and emissions of carbon dioxide today are more than 46 per cent higher than their 1990 level. Forests continue to be lost at an alarming rate. Overexploitation of marine fish stocks is resulting in diminished yields. More of the earth’s land and marine areas are under protection, but birds, mammals and other species are heading for extinction at an ever faster rate, with declines in both populations and distribution.

 

Worldwide, the mortality rate for children under five dropped by 41 per cent—from 87 deaths per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 51 in 2011. Despite this enormous accomplishment, more rapid progress is needed to meet the 2015 target of a two-thirds reduction in child deaths. Most maternal deaths are preventable, but progress in this area is falling short. Globally, the maternal mortality ratio declined by 47 per cent over the last two decades, from 400 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births to 210 between 1990 and 2010. Meeting the MDG target of reducing the ratio by three quarters will require accelerated interventions and stronger political backing for women and children.

 

Also in other areas progress has not been sufficient: Access to antiretroviral therapy and knowledge about HIV prevention must expand. In 2011, 57 millions primary school age children were still denied their right to primary education. From 1990 to 2011, 1.9 billion people gained access to a latrine, flush toilet or other improved sanitation facility but more rapid progress is needed to meet the MDG sanitation target.

 

A low debt burden and an improved climate for trade are levelling the playing field for developing countries. However, there is less aid money overall, with the poorest countries most adversely affected. In 2012, bilateral official development assistance to least developed countries fell by 13 per cent, to about $26 billion.

 

Global attention needs to focus on disparities

 

Progress towards the eight MDGs has been uneven – not only among regions and countries, but also between rural and urban areas, men and women, and among other population groups within countries. In 2011, only 53 per cent of births in rural areas were attended by skilled health personnel, versus 84 per cent in urban areas. Eighty-three per cent of the population without access to an improved drinking water source live in rural communities. Also, gender-based inequalities in decision-making power persist.

 

Creating a stable foundation for future development action

 

The United Nations is working with governments, civil society and other partners to build on the momentum generated by the MDGs, to craft an ambitious, yet realistic, post-2015 agenda. A successful conclusion to the MDGs will be an important building block for a successor development agenda, and volumes of experience and lessons learned from the MDGs will benefit prospects for continued progress.

 

“Through accelerated action, the world can achieve the MDGs and generate momentum for an ambitious and inspiring post-2015 development framework,” Mr. Ban said. “Now is the time to step up our efforts to build a more just, secure and sustainable future for all.”

 

For more information:

 

United Nations Millennium Development Goals Indicators (http://mdgs.un.org/‎)

United Nations Millennium Development Goals (http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/)

 

Counting 9.6 billion humans on earth by 2050

The current world population of 7.2 billion is projected to increase by 1 billion over the next 12 years and reach 9.6 billion by 2050, according to a report launched by DESA’s Population division in June. The report points out that growth will be mainly in developing countries, with more than half in Africa. Watch our interview with John Wilmoth, Director of the Population Division, who gives us some insights about the last figures available.

 

In our video interview, John Wilmoth is highlighting the most surprising findings of this report, mainly focused on fertility rates, how to cope with the lack of registry systems in developing countries, as well as the challenges induced by the global increase of life expectancy.

 

The report, World Population Prospects: the 2012 Revision, notes that the population of developed regions will remain largely unchanged at around 1.3 billion from now until 2050. In contrast, the 49 least developed countries are projected to double in size from around 900 million people in 2013 to 1.8 billion in 2050.

 

“Although population growth has slowed for the world as a whole, this report reminds us that some developing countries, especially in Africa, are still growing rapidly,” said the Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, Wu Hongbo in a press release on the report in June.

 

New information available

 

Compared to previous assessments of world population trends, the new projected total population is higher, mainly due to new information obtained on fertility levels of certain countries. For example, in 15 high-fertility countries of sub-Saharan Africa, the estimated average number of children per woman has been adjusted upwards by more than 5 per cent.

 

“In some cases, the actual level of fertility appears to have risen in recent years; in other cases, the previous estimate was too low,” said the Director of the Population Division in the UN’s Department of Economic and Social Affairs, John Wilmoth, during a press conference in New York.

 

“While there has been a rapid fall in the average number of children per woman in large developing countries such as China, India, Indonesia, Iran, Brazil and South Africa […] rapid growth is expected to continue over the next few decades in countries with high levels of fertility such as Nigeria, Niger, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia and Uganda but also Afghanistan and Timor-Leste, where there are more than five children per woman.”

 

Mr. Wilmoth added that changes in fertility rates over the next few decades could have major consequence for population size, structure and distribution in the long run.

 

China’s population to start decreasing

 

The report notes that India is expected to become the world’s largest country, passing China around 2028, when both countries will have populations of 1.45 billion. After that, India’s population will continue to grow and China’s is expected to start decreasing. Meanwhile, Nigeria’s population is expected to surpass that of the United States before 2050.

 

Europe’s population is projected to decline by 14 per cent, the report states, and Mr. Wilmoth warned that the continent is already facing challenges in providing care and support for a rapidly aging population.

 

82 years average life expectancy by 2100

 

Overall, life expectancy is projected to increase in developed and developing countries in future years. At the global level, it is projected to reach 76 years in the period 2045-2050 and 82 years in 2095-2100. By the end of the century, people in developed countries could live on average around 89 years, compared to about 81 years in developing regions.

 

The report’s figures are based on a comprehensive review of available demographic data from 233 countries and areas around the world, including the 2010 round of population censuses.

 

Source: UN News/DESA

 

For more information: http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/index.htm

Counting 9.6 billion humans on earth by 2050

Posted on July 1, 2013 at 3:50 PM Comments comments (0)

Counting 9.6 billion humans on earth by 2050

The current world population of 7.2 billion is projected to increase by 1 billion over the next 12 years and reach 9.6 billion by 2050, according to a report launched by DESA’s Population division in June. The report points out that growth will be mainly in developing countries, with more than half in Africa. Watch our interview with John Wilmoth, Director of the Population Division, who gives us some insights about the last figures available.

 

In our video interview, John Wilmoth is highlighting the most surprising findings of this report, mainly focused on fertility rates, how to cope with the lack of registry systems in developing countries, as well as the challenges induced by the global increase of life expectancy.

 

The report, World Population Prospects: the 2012 Revision, notes that the population of developed regions will remain largely unchanged at around 1.3 billion from now until 2050. In contrast, the 49 least developed countries are projected to double in size from around 900 million people in 2013 to 1.8 billion in 2050.

 

“Although population growth has slowed for the world as a whole, this report reminds us that some developing countries, especially in Africa, are still growing rapidly,” said the Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, Wu Hongbo in a press release on the report in June.

 

New information available

 

Compared to previous assessments of world population trends, the new projected total population is higher, mainly due to new information obtained on fertility levels of certain countries. For example, in 15 high-fertility countries of sub-Saharan Africa, the estimated average number of children per woman has been adjusted upwards by more than 5 per cent.

 

“In some cases, the actual level of fertility appears to have risen in recent years; in other cases, the previous estimate was too low,” said the Director of the Population Division in the UN’s Department of Economic and Social Affairs, John Wilmoth, during a press conference in New York.

 

“While there has been a rapid fall in the average number of children per woman in large developing countries such as China, India, Indonesia, Iran, Brazil and South Africa […] rapid growth is expected to continue over the next few decades in countries with high levels of fertility such as Nigeria, Niger, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia and Uganda but also Afghanistan and Timor-Leste, where there are more than five children per woman.”

 

Mr. Wilmoth added that changes in fertility rates over the next few decades could have major consequence for population size, structure and distribution in the long run.

 

China’s population to start decreasing

 

The report notes that India is expected to become the world’s largest country, passing China around 2028, when both countries will have populations of 1.45 billion. After that, India’s population will continue to grow and China’s is expected to start decreasing. Meanwhile, Nigeria’s population is expected to surpass that of the United States before 2050.

 

Europe’s population is projected to decline by 14 per cent, the report states, and Mr. Wilmoth warned that the continent is already facing challenges in providing care and support for a rapidly aging population.

 

82 years average life expectancy by 2100

 

Overall, life expectancy is projected to increase in developed and developing countries in future years. At the global level, it is projected to reach 76 years in the period 2045-2050 and 82 years in 2095-2100. By the end of the century, people in developed countries could live on average around 89 years, compared to about 81 years in developing regions.

 

The report’s figures are based on a comprehensive review of available demographic data from 233 countries and areas around the world, including the 2010 round of population censuses.

 

Source: UN News/DESA

 

For more information: http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/index.htm

June 26 - July 10, 2013 "Intergenerational Solidarity"

Posted on July 1, 2013 at 3:45 PM Comments comments (0)

FOR INFORMATION AND DISSEMINATION

As you are aware, at the Rio+20 Conference UN Member States invited the Secretary-General to present a report on promoting intergenerational solidarity for the achievement of sustainable development, taking into account the needs of future generations. The UN has launched an online consultation from 26 June to 10 July 2013 seeking views on some of the key questions that are framed within the context of that report. For more information please visit us online or contribute to our Facebook page.

www.futurejustice.org

 

________________

 

 

POUR INFORMATION ET DIFFUSION

 

En raison de la décision de la Conférence Rio+20 d’inviter le Secrétaire général de présenter un rapport sur la nécessité de promouvoir la solidarité intergénérationnelle aux fins de la réalisation du développement durable, en tenant compte des besoins des générations futures, l’ONU entame une consultation en ligne du 26 juin au 10 juillet 2013 afin de chercher de différentes perspectives sur les questions essentielles encadrées dans le contexte de ce rapport. Pour tout renseignement, veuillez consulter notre site internet ou donnez votre avis sur notre compte Facebook.

________________

 

 

PARA INFORMACIÓN Y DIFUSIÓN

 

En la Conferencia de Río+20, los estados miembros de Naciones Unidas invitaron al Secretario General a presentar un informe sobre la necesidad de promover la solidaridad intergeneracional para lograr el desarrollo sostenible, teniendo en cuenta las necesidades de las generaciones futuras. Por consiguiente, las Naciones Unidas convocó a una consulta en línea del 26 de Junio al 10 de Julio del 2013 en la cual solicita puntos de vista acerca de algunas cuestiones principales que se abordan en el contexto de dicho informe. Para obtener mayor información, por favor visítenos en línea o participe a través de nuestra página de Facebook.

 

Summary on co-chairs meetings for the 4th OWG on SDG's

Posted on June 30, 2013 at 9:15 AM Comments comments (0)

 

Summary on co-chairs meetings with major groups and stakeholders from civil society at the 4th Open Working Group on SDGs

 

The co-chairs Mr Kamau, Kenya and Mr. Körösi, Hungary, introduced inter-active debates with major groups and stakeholders from civil society on the Sustainable Development Goals, every morning from 9 – 10 AM during the 3 days of the 4th OWG, to which member states were invited. Each of the morning sessions focused on one or several of the themes being addressed during the 4th OWG. The sessions were self-organised by members of civil society major groups and other stakeholders, who selected 2 main panellist to introduce a civil society perspective on the themes, followed by interventions from the floor, followed by one or two responses or comments from member states and concluding remarks by the panellists and co-chairs.

 

Monday 17 June

 

Co-chairs Körösi and Kamau welcomed the representatives of major groups & stakeholders as well as member states and introduced the panellists, and asked guiding questions including what is the price of inaction and what level of ambition do we need regarding employment, decent work and social protection.

 

The first panellist, Alison Tate, of ITUC (Int’l Trade Union Confederation) speaking on behalf of the Workers and Trade Unions Major Group, recalled that the Rio+20 outcome document recognizes that decent work & social protection are essential for sustainable development. ITUC calls for 2 SD goals: 1) access to full employment & decent work for all and 2) universal social protection floors. Decent work has 4 elements: productive employment, rights, social protection and social dialogue. Decent work, with all of its 4 elements, is needed to drive structural transformation, to help develop a more socially inclusive and economically dynamic development model, to achieve poverty eradication, combat inequality, in all countries. All elements are needed to address the interlinkages of economic/social/environmental aspects and impacts.Tate lamented the use of "good jobs" which undermines the efforts on "decent work," which are already agreed as global standard under ILO. Public funding of social protection from domestic resources is critical, international cooperation and international funding is too.

 

Masaya Llavaneros Blanco, of DAWN (Development Alternatives with Women for a New era) and speaking on the Women's major group, recalled the interlinked & multiple crises of food, fuel, finance. The Women’s MG calls for a fundamental point of departure for SDGs. SDGs should be based on the principles of non-regression & universal human rights. SDGs should pursue universalism, taking into account diversity of peoples' needs. Blanco proposed 3 goals:

 

Goal 1: Macroeconomic environment that preserves national policy space for gov'ts to fulfil human rights & development, including targets on e.g. % reduce tax evasion

 

Goal 2: Full employment & decent work for all. Living wage, closing gender pay gap, redistributing unpaid care work, including possible indicators and targets:

Living wage for all

Elimination of the gender pay gap

Regulate informal work; recognize domestic work as work (ILO 189) and pay attention to migrant workers

Redistribute unpaid work among genders and between household and states

 

Goal 3: Social protection for all, with basic income protections, access to essential services, care services.

Basic income + age pensions (public provision)

Free universal access to essential services, public

Allocation of x% GDP to social protection

Universal public provision of care services

 

 

Sofia Garcia SOS Children’s Villages, Major Group Children and Youth: Social protection & employment is a tool for empowerment, needed to transition to independent lives. The most marginalized must be targeted. Resources must be secured to promote innovation & self-creation of jobs. Social protection policies must be child-friendly and cover at all times their needs for care and protection.

 

Vladimir Cuk, of the Int'l Disability Alliance wants to remove barriers to decent work for people with disabilities, who currently face twice as high unemployment levels, in some developing countries up to 80%. Cuk called for a goal on a global social protection floor, and that social protection should not be perceived as charity but as a right.

Minister of Development Cooperation Friis-Bach from Denmark asked ITUC about links between social protection, decent work & green jobs, sustainable development.

Tate responded on "just transition" measures for sustainable development, and how social protection is essential to achieve this.

Andrea, HelpAge International called for a global social protection as a goal as a core enabler for sustainable development.

The LDC civil society alliance at the UN called for a cancelation of LDC debt to fund decent work and social protection.

Kate Lappin of APWLD (Asian Pacific Forum on Women Law and Development) Thailand, called for full employment, decent work & social protection, as being essential for women's rights, but also in reducing inequalities. A living wage target is essential to ensure that women can move from starvation wages to ones that allow life with dignity.

The Business and Industry Major Group called for internal growth based on job creation by enterprises, and the need for efficient regulation of the business community.

Co-chair Kamau expressed a concern is he had heard a litany of demands, but countries would need to understand how these can financed and implemented. If you can tell us how to finance it in the context of "real budgets" it will help.

Tate presented many options to finance social protection, including Contributory and non-contributory pension schemes, reallocation of public expenditure for example from military spending to social protection, taxation reform including the Financial Transaction Tax; corporate taxation and addressing illicit financial flows.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 18 June

 

Co-chairs Körösi and Kamau welcomed the representatives of major groups & stakeholders as well as member states, introduced the topic of this morning’s discussion “youth, education and culture” and introduced the panellists.

 

Panellist Samuel Kissi, Youth Coalition, Ghana, speaking on behalf of the Children and Youth Major Group speaks on education and calls to adopt the Youth Bali Declaration and to a target on include gender equality in education. Kissi calls to put education at the centre of development agenda and to ensure the link to better health including through sexual education. Kissi noted that each year of girl’s secondary education increases her future income by 25%, in some countries.

 

Panellist Antonia Wulff of ‘Education International’, opposed the HLP post2015 report’s goal on education defined as ‚affordable’, instead a goal is needed on free, quality, education. Wulff proposed 2 targets:

TARGET 1 By 2030, every child completes a full cycle of continuous, free quality early childhood, primary, lower and upper secondary education, which enables them to achieve their potential as human beings and to contribute positively as active members of society.

TARGET 2 By 2030, all young people and adults have equitable access to quality post-secondary education and lifelong learning, enabling them to acquire knowledge, skills and competences to achieve their full potential and participate positively in society and in the world of work.

 

The youngest 17-year old participant, representing ‘Youth Blast’ proposes 6 ways to finance Education as part of Sustainable Development Goals including a 30% reduction military spending, a global tax on chemicals and the financial transaction tax.

 

Sarah Shaw on behalf of IPPF (International Planned Parenthood federation) reported how early and forced marriages, early pregnancy, sexual harassment and violence, HIV/AIDs, lack of sanitation facilities in schools and other sexual and reproductive health challenges are often at the root of exclusion from education, for young people, particularly girls. She calls for inter-linkage targets for health and education to address these causes.

 

Marcela Balara of ICAE, Uruguay, call for Adult Learning and Education (ALE) as a target, saying it is crucial to overcome poverty and achieve greater equality, to address the global food, energy, environmental and financial crises, for peace.

 

Mr Friis-Bach, Minister of Development Cooperation of Denmark sees the need for a rights framework to address the complexity of education, including sexual education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 19 June

 

Co-chair Körösi, Permanent Representative of Hungary opened the session and welcomed the participants from major groups & stakeholders and from member states and introduced the 2 panellists Alexandra Garita of Resurj Mexico and speaking on behalf of the Women’s Major Group and Mikael Kalmus Eliasz speaking on behalf of the Children & Youth Major Group .

 

Alexandra Garita called for a holistic health goal which should be based on the concept of wellbeing and not merely absence of death and disease presented that a universal. A goal of ensuring healthy lives should have a priority on women's and adolescents' health, including access to comprehensive sexual and reproductive health services and protection of reproductive rights. Focus must be placed on achieving health equity, addressing the social determinants of health, and reaching the most marginalized and vulnerable, close to where they live, with the services they need.

 

Mike Kalmus Eliasz: Population dynamics are not a goal or target are not an end in themselves, but a tool to plan. Data collection is very important. A target on universal health coverage must also focus on accessibility, especially for the most marginalized; this needs the elimination of user fees.

 

Silvia Steffanoni of Help-Age International presented why aging is a universal concern and must be considered for SDGs and Post2015, and that currently health data is mostly not collected on older populations; Demographic surveys “stop” at the age of 49. This is a big gap.

 

Rachel Jacobson of the Post-2015 Youth Coalition and Major Group Children and Youth; Taboos about adolescent sexuality have blinded us to their health needs. She called for comprehensive sexuality education & sexual & reproductive health services for adolescents. Jacobson noted that there are things governments can do right now to eliminate barriers, such as end age restrictions to services.

 

Josef Verovic, Framework Convention Alliance suggests targets on reducing preventable deaths & tobacco use.

 

Matthew Gordon of Sustainable World Initiative states that democraphics are not destiny and reinforces calls for universal sexual and reproductive health and rights.

 

Sally Dunne, of the Mining Working Group at the UN, presented the devastating impact of extractive industries on women's health, and that an estimated 25% of the disease burden is caused by environmental pollution. A goal on environmental health and halting pollution from the extractive industry should be integrated in SDGs.

 

Marianne Hasselgrave, COMMAT: There is no place for population control measures or setting demographic targets in the SDGs. In support of a comprehensive target on sexual and reproductive health and rights, and in response to the UNFPA statement that “In today’s world there is no place for coercive measures of population control or for setting demographic targets”, the WMG emphasises that the only control that should be exercised is over one’s own fertility. The SDGs, therefore, should empower women and young people to exercise their rights to choose if, when and how many children to have, by being rights-based and gender-sensitive, addressing the unmet need for family planning and providing access to education at all levels, including comprehensive sexuality education.

 

Ireland spoke on the link between social protection and health and need to highlight linkages between these two dimensions, calling for disaggregation of data.

 

 

Co-Chair Kamau, Ambassador of Kenya, asked with which Means of Implementation countries are going to achieve and implement these goals, and that countries cannot just rely on taxation, but will have to tackle productive aspects to create wellbeing as well as addressing misallocations, saving money and remembering that is difficult to reallocate resources within existing budgets. Kamau commented that speakers should not focus on population decline & growth, instead focus on the right strategic approaches to addressing the needs of populations.

 

Eliasz concludes with the need to look at how trade agreements impact health and for targets which will lead to changes.

 

Garita responding to the concerns of Co-chair Kamau on MOI presented the example of Mexico's Universal Health Care and social protection schemes and the positive impact on the poorest and most marginalized, stating that “it is possible”. Income for UHC can be generated amongst other through the financial transaction tax, wich could raise revenues in excess of $200 billion, part of which could contribute to development.

Negotiations Update

Posted on June 30, 2013 at 8:50 AM Comments comments (0)

TO RIO+20 NGO MAJOR GROUP

 

Last Friday morning, 21 June, the HLPF co-facilitators gathered delegates to inform them that they would be given until 4 pm to negotiate the differences among themselves to submit final amendments. At 4 pm delegates were presented with the attached clean compilation text for adoption to be forwarded to the President of the General Assembly for adoption by the GA. The United States, Canada, G77 and Mexico requested additional time to consult with their capitals and colleagues. The co-facilitators agreed with the understanding that any changes to the text must be agreed by all by Monday, 24 June, at 4 pm when delegates will be invited to meet one final time to formally approve the draft resolution for submission to the PGA. FYI -- We were assured by the EU that OP13-OP16 on Major Groups and other relevant stakeholders is final.

21 June clean compilation text with compromise proposals is attached.

IISD report on HLPF negotiations on 14 June: http://uncsd.iisd.org/news/hlpf-process-approaches-final-negotiations/

The fourth session of the SDGs Open Working Group occurred 17-19 June 2013.

 

IISD report on OWG 4th Session: http://www.iisd.ca/sdgs/owg4/19jun.html

Report by Women's Major Group of three morning sessions is attached.

SDG OWG #4 "3 Day Hearings" Co Facilitators' Text

Posted on June 30, 2013 at 8:50 AM Comments comments (0)

21 June 2013

 

 

CO-FACILITATORS' TEXT

 

 

Format and organizational aspects of the high-level political forum on sustainable development (Agreed ad ref)

 

 

The General Assembly,

 

PP1 Recalling its resolution 66/288 of 27 July 2012 by which it endorsed the outcome document of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, entitled “The future we want”; [Agreed ad ref]

 

PP2 Emphasizing the need for an improved and more effective institutional framework for sustainable development which should be guided by the specific functions required and mandates involved; address the shortcomings of the current system; take into account all relevant implications; promote synergies and coherence; seek to avoid duplication and eliminate unnecessary overlaps within the United Nations system; and reduce administrative burdens and build on existing arrangements; (Agreed ad ref)

 

PP3 Recalling the decision contained in paragraph 84 of the outcome document of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development establishing a universal, intergovernmental high-level political forum, building on the strengths, experiences, resources and inclusive participation modalities of the Commission on Sustainable Development, and subsequently replacing the Commission, as well as the decision that the high-level political forum shall follow on the implementation of sustainable development and should avoid overlap with existing structures, bodies and entities in a cost effective manner; (Agreed ad ref)

 

PP4 Reaffirming the role and authority of the General Assembly on global matters of concern to the international community, as set out in the Charter, and its central position as the chief deliberative, policy making and representative organ of the United Nations and recognizing the need for it to further integrate sustainable development as key element of the overarching framework for the United Nations activities; (Agreed ad ref)

 

PP5 Reaffirming the commitment to strengthen the Economic and Social Council within its mandate under the Charter, as a principal organ in the integrated and coordinated follow-up of the outcomes of all major United Nations conferences and summits in the economic, social, environmental and related fields, and recognizing the key role of the Council in achieving a balanced integration of the three dimensions of sustainable development; (Agreed ad ref)

 

PP6 Recalling the Rio Declaration, Agenda 21, the Programme for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21, the Plan of Implementation of the World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg Plan of Implementation) and the Johannesburg Declaration on Sustainable Development; (Agreed ad ref)

 

PP7 Recalling further the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States (Barbados Programme of Action) and the Mauritius Strategy for the Further Implementation of the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States; (Agreed ad ref)

 

PP8 Also recalling the Programme of Action for the Least Developed Countries for the Decade 2011–2020 (Istanbul Programme of Action), the Almaty Programme of Action: Addressing the Special Needs of Landlocked Developing Countries within a New Global Framework for Transit Transport Cooperation for Landlocked and Transit Developing Countries, and the political declaration on Africa’s development needs and the New Partnership for Africa’s Development; (Agreed ad ref)

 

PP9 Also recalling the commitments in the outcomes of all the major United Nations conferences and summits in the economic, social and environmental fields, including the United Nations Millennium Declaration, the 2005 World Summit Outcome, the Monterrey Consensus of the International Conference on Financing for Development, the Doha Declaration on Financing for Development: outcome document of the Follow-up International Conference on Financing for Development to Review the Implementation of the Monterrey Consensus, the outcome document of the High-level Plenary Meeting of the General Assembly on the Millennium Development Goals, the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development, the key actions for the further implementation of the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action;

 

PP10 Recalling also its resolution 67/203 of 21 December 2012; (Agreed ad ref)

 

 

The General Assembly,

 

OP1. Takes note of the report of the Secretary General on the lessons learned from the Commission on Sustainable Development; (Agreed ad ref)

 

OP2. Decides that the high-level political forum shall provide political leadership, guidance and recommendations for sustainable development, follow-up and review progress in the implementation of sustainable development commitments, enhance the integration of the three dimensions of sustainable development in a holistic and cross-sectoral manner at all levels, and have a focused, dynamic and action-oriented agenda, ensuring the appropriate consideration of new and emerging sustainable development challenges;

 

OP3. Decides further that the meetings of the forum will be convened under the auspices of the GA and under the auspices of ECOSOC; (Agreed ad ref)

 

OP4. Decides that, consistent with its intergovernmental universal character, all meetings of the forum will be open to all Member States of the United Nations and States members of specialized agencies;

 

OP5. Decides that, in all meetings of the forum, every effort shall be made to reach consensus;

 

OP6. Decides that the meetings of the forum under the auspices of the General Assembly will: (Agreed ad ref)

 

a) be convened at the highest possible level, with the participation of Heads of State and Government;

b) be convened every four years by the President of the General Assembly for a period of two days, at the beginning of the General Assembly session, as well as on other occasions, on exceptional basis, upon decision by the General Assembly; (Agreed ad ref)

c) be chaired by the President of the General Assembly; (Agreed ad ref)

d) result in a concise negotiated political declaration to be submitted for the consideration of the General Assembly;

 

OP7. Decides that the meetings of the forum under the auspices of the ECOSOC will (Agreed ad ref)

 

a) be convened annually by the President of ECOSOC for a period of eight days, including a three-day ministerial segment to be held in the framework of the substantive session of the Council building on and subsequently replacing the Annual Ministerial Review as of 2016;

b) be chaired by the President of ECOSOC; (Agreed ad ref)

c) have a thematic focus reflecting the integration of the three dimensions of sustainable development, in line with the thematic focus of the ECOSOC activities and consistent with the post-2015 development agenda;

d) follow-up and review progress in the implementation of all the major United Nations conferences and summits in the economic, social and environmental fields, as well as their respective means of implementation, improve cooperation and coordination within the United Nations system on sustainable development programmes and policies, promote the sharing of best practices and experiences relating to the implementation of sustainable development and, on a voluntary basis, facilitate sharing of experiences, including successes, challenges and lessons learned and promote system-wide coherence and coordination of sustainable development policies address;

e) take into account the work of the Development Cooperation Forum, as well as other activities of the ECOSOC relating to the integration and implementation of sustainable development; (Agreed ad ref)

f) benefit from regional preparatory processes;

g) result in an negotiated ministerial declaration which will constitute the main outcome of the high-level segment of the substantive session of the Economic and Social Council and will be included in the report of the Council to the General Assembly;

 

OP8. Decides that the forum, under the auspices of ECOSOC, will conduct regular reviews, starting in 2016, on the follow-up and implementation of sustainable development commitments and objectives, including those related to the means of implementation, within the context of the post-2015 development agenda, and further decides that these reviews will:

 

a) be voluntary, while encouraging reporting, and include developed and developing countries, as well as relevant UN entities;

b) be State-led, involving ministerial and other relevant high-level participants;

c) provide a platform for partnerships, including through the participation of Major Groups and other relevant stakeholders;

d) replace, the National Voluntary Presentations held in the context of the Annual Ministerial Level Substantive Reviews of ECOSOC, building upon on the relevant provisions of GA resolution 61/16, as well as experiences and lessons learned in this context;

 

OP9. Decides that all meetings convened under the auspices of the General Assembly will operate under the rules of procedure of the main committees of he General Assembly, as applicable, unless otherwise provided in the present resolution, and that all meetings convened under the auspices of the ECOSOC will operate under the rules of procedure of the functional commissions of ECOSOC, as applicable, unless otherwise provided in the present resolution;

 

OP10. Underlines that the arrangement established by the Economic and Social Council for the Commission on Sustainable Development in Council decision 1995/201 of 8 February 1995 will apply to the meetings of the forum held under the auspices of ECOSOC, and that the arrangement established by GA resolution 65/276 of 10 May 2011 will apply to the meetings of the forum held under the auspices of the GA; (Agreed ad ref)

 

OP11. Decides that the meetings of the forum will devote adequate time to discuss the specific sustainable development challenges facing developing countries, including the most vulnerable countries, in particular least developed countries, small island developing states, landlocked developing countries and Africa, with the aim of enhancing engagement and implementing commitments, and recognizes the specific challenges facing the middle-income countries to achieve sustainable development, while taking into account the needs and capacity of these countries to mobilize domestic resources;

 

OP12. Encourages States to ensure that their participation in the meeting of the Forum reflect the balanced integration of the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable development from their national perspective; (Agreed ad ref)

 

OP13. Acknowledges the importance of the regional dimension of sustainable development and invites the United Nations regional commissions to contribute to the work of the forum, including through annual regional meetings, with the involvement of other relevant regional entities, major groups and other relevant stakeholders, as appropriate;

 

OP14. Stresses the need for the forum to promote transparency and implementation through further enhancing the consultative role and participation of Major Groups and other relevant stakeholders at the international level in order to better make use of their expertise, while retaining the intergovernmental nature of discussions, and in this regard decides that the forum will be open to Major Groups, other relevant stakeholders and entities having received a standing invitation to participate as observers in the GA, building on arrangements and practices observed by the Commission on Sustainable Development, including Economic and Social Council decision 1993/215 and Economic and Social Council resolution 1996/31 of 25 July 1996, which will be applicable to the forum;

 

OP15. Decides, in this regard, that, while retaining the intergovernmental character of the forum, the representatives of Major Groups and other relevant stakeholders will be allowed to:

 

a) attend all official meetings of the forum;

b) access to all official information and documents;

c) intervene in official meetings;

d) submit documents and present written and oral contributions;

e) make recommendations;

f) organize side-events and roundtables, in cooperation with Member States and the UN Secretariat;

 

OP16. Encourages Major Groups as identified in Agenda 21 and other stakeholders, such as private philanthropic organizations, education and academic entities, persons with disabilities, volunteer groups and other stakeholders active in areas related to sustainable development, to autonomously establish and maintain effective coordination mechanisms for participation in the high-level political forum and for actions derived from that participation at global, regional and national levels, in a way that ensures effective, broad and balanced participation by regions and types of organizations; (Agreed ad ref)

OP17. Invites the organizations of the United Nations system, including the Bretton Woods institutions, and other relevant intergovernmental organizations, including the World Trade Organization to contribute within their respective mandates to the discussions of the forum; (Agreed ad ref)

 

OP18. Emphasizes that the forum shall provide a dynamic platform for regular dialogue and for stocktaking and agenda-setting to advance sustainable development and that the agenda of all meetings of the high-level political forum will be focused, while allowing flexibility to address new and emerging issues; (Agreed ad ref)

 

OP19. Reaffirms that the forum shall contribute to the enhanced integration of the three dimensions of sustainable development in a holistic and cross-sectoral manner at all levels and, in this regard, invites the Forum to take into account the contributions and work of relevant United Nations intergovernmental bodies in the social, economic and environmental fields; (Agreed ad ref)

 

OP20. Decides that the forum will strengthen the science-policy interface, through examination of documentation, bringing together dispersed information and assessments, including in the form of a global sustainable development report, building on existing assessments, as well as enhance evidence-based decision-making at all levels and contribute to strengthening ongoing capacity-building for data collection and analysis in developing countries and requests the Forum to consider, in 2014, the scope and methodology of a global sustainable development report, based on a proposal of the Secretary General reflecting the views and recommendations from Member States, as well as from relevant UN entities, including the Committee on Development Policy;

 

OP21. Decides further that the forum can provide recommendations to the board of the ten-year framework of programmes for sustainable consumption and production, as well as to the United Nations Environment Programme as the secretariat of the ten-year framework of programmes for sustainable consumption and production, taking into account their reports;

 

OP22. Requests the President of the General Assembly and the President of ECOSOC to coordinate with the bureau of ECOSOC and with the bureaux of the relevant committees of the GA to organize the activities of the Forum, benefiting from the advice of the UN System, the Major Groups and the other relevant stakeholders;

 

OP23. Decides that the forum will be supported by the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the UN Secretariat in close cooperation with all relevant entities of the United Nations system, including funds and programmes, multilateral financial and trade institutions, the Rio conventions and other relevant treaty bodies and international organizations within their respective mandates; (Agreed ad ref)

 

OP24. Requests the Secretary-General to carry over all the remaining funds from the CSD Trust Fund to a voluntary Trust Fund of the forum, in order to facilitate participation of developing countries, least developed countries, representatives of major groups, as well as other relevant stakeholders, as appropriate, in the work of the forum and to support the forum’s preparations, and, in this regard, invites Member States, financial institutions and other organizations to contribute to the voluntary trust fund of the forum.

 

OP 25. Decides that travel expenses for one representative of each Least Developed Countries will be paid from the United Nations regular budget for participation to all formal meetings of the forum;

 

OP 26. Recommends that the Economic and Social Council abolish the CSD effective from the conclusion of its 20th and last session, to be held prior to the first meeting of the forum, pursuant to GA resolution 67/203 of 21 December 2012,

 

OP27. Decides that the first meeting of the forum under the auspices of the General Assembly will have an inaugural character, requests the President of the General Assembly to convene it at the beginning of the 68th session for the duration of one day, and decides that, on an extraordinary basis and only for the purpose of this meeting, the outcome of the meeting will consist of a President’s Summary;

 

OP28. Further decides to consider at its 69th session the need to convene a meeting of the forum under the auspices of the General Assembly in 2015 in relation with the launch of the post-2015 development agenda;

 

OP29. Decides to review the format and the organizational aspects of the forum at its seventy-third session, unless otherwise decided.

 

OP30. Emphasizes that the implementation of the arrangements relating to the meetings of the forum under the auspices of the ECOSOC will have to take into account the outcome of the review of UNGA resolution 61/16.

 

 

RIO+20 NGO MAJOR GROUP

Posted on June 30, 2013 at 8:45 AM Comments comments (0)

Last Friday morning, 21 June, the HLPF co-facilitators gathered delegates to inform them that they would be given until 4 pm to negotiate the differences among themselves to submit final amendments. At 4 pm delegates were presented with the attached clean compilation text for adoption to be forwarded to the President of the General Assembly for adoption by the GA. The United States, Canada, G77 and Mexico requested additional time to consult with their capitals and colleagues. The co-facilitators agreed with the understanding that any changes to the text must be agreed by all by Monday, 24 June, at 4 pm when delegates will be invited to meet one final time to formally approve the draft resolution for submission to the PGA. FYI -- We were assured by the EU that OP13-OP16 on Major Groups and other relevant stakeholders is final.

21 June clean compilation text with compromise proposals is attached.

IISD report on HLPF negotiations on 14 June: http://uncsd.iisd.org/news/hlpf-process-approaches-final-negotiations/

The fourth session of the SDGs Open Working Group occurred 17-19 June 2013.

 

IISD report on OWG 4th Session: http://www.iisd.ca/sdgs/owg4/19jun.html

Report by Women's Major Group of three morning sessions is attached.

Sustainable Development "Post Rio Process" OWG

Posted on June 30, 2013 at 8:40 AM Comments comments (0)

UN-NGLS Consultation on 4 Post-2015 Reports

Dear colleagues,

We write to inform you That the consultation Facilitated by UN-NGLS in partnership with the Post-2015 Development Planning Team / Executive Office of the Secretary-General is now Launched in Arabic , English , French , and Spanish . The consultation gathers critical analysis from civil society on four post-2015 reports Submitted to the UN Secretary-General:

High-level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda (Post-2015 HLP)

A Sustainable Development Solutions Network (NSDS)

UN Global Compact (UNGC)

UN Development Group (UNDG): The Global Conversation Begins (UNDG This preliminary report is now included Because the final is not expected up to September.)

UN-NGLS is aware That some of You have produced written responses and / or press statements since the release of the High-level Panel report two weeks ago. We encourage you to cut and paste the relevant parts of thesis statements into the NGLS online consultation so That They May Be Considered for the synthesis report. Submitting The deadline for contributions written in English, Spanish and French is 12 July 2013. The deadline for contributions Submitting written in Arabic is 1 July 2013 due to Ramadan.

The consultation aussi Will draw on inputs from regional teleconferences in Arabic, English, French, and Spanish, Aimed at Increasing the analytical contributions from South-based civil society. For more information about the regional teleconferences, please see this paper .

The consultation synthesis Will focus on regional perspectives and be Delivered to the Secretary-General, to Heads of State and Government at the General Assembly Special Event on the Millennium Development Goals on 25 September, and to the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development Goals (OWG on SDGs) .

The synthesis aussi Will serve as the Basis for a day of dialogue betweens organisms civil society and Member States on 22 September. The intention is to engage in a substantive exchange with Member States on a number of key issues civil society HAS That Emphasized (including in previous consultations related UN-NGLS). These include for example: systemic issues of trade, finance and development, human rights and accountability framework Mechanisms, public-private partnerships, extractive industries and land grabbing, social, economic, environment / climate, and gender justice and peace and conflict. (More information on the September 22 event Will follow in the next FEW weeks.)

For more information about the consultation, Including detailed instructions for participation and Supporting resources, please visit: www.worldwewant2015.org/ NGLSconsultation . Contributors Have you do not Have Sufficient bandwidth Internet for posting online May emperata overture send em via email, instructions are here . Thank you for taking the time to Contribute to this important area of discussion.

Best regards,

UN-NGLS

Updated information: Consultation NGLS about four reports on the development program for the post-2015

Dear Colleagues,

We inform you that the consultation facilitated by the Department of Non-Governmental Liaison United Nations (UN-NGLS) in partnership with the planning team post-2015 Office of the Secretary-General is now launched in Arabic , English , French , and Spanish . The consultation will bring together the analysis of civil society on the four reports for the post-2015 submitted to the Secretary-General:

1) High-Level Panel on the post-2015 (post-2015 HLP)

2) Network solutions for the sustainable development of the UN (SDSN English)

3) the UN Global Compact - (UN Global Compact)

4) Group of the United Nations Development Group (UNDG): "The global conversation begins" (UNDG This preliminary report is included as the final report will not be available until September).

NGLS is aware that some of you have produced written responses and / or press release following the report of the High Level Group two weeks ago. Therefore, we encourage you to copy and paste the relevant parts of these statements in the online consultation NGLS beings so that they can be considered for the summary report. The deadline for submitting contributions written in English, Spanish and French is 12 July 2013. The deadline for submitting contributions is written in Arabic on it on 1 July 2013 because of Ramadan.

The consultation will also rely on contributions from regional teleconferences conducted in Arabic, English, French and Spanish, in order to increase the analytical contributions of civil society in the South. For more information on regional teleconferences, please download this paper .

The synthesis of the consultation will focus on regional perspectives and will be handed to the Secretary General, heads of state and government at the special meeting of the General Assembly on the Millennium Development, September 25, and Group open work on sustainable development goals (SDGs on OWG).

The synthesis will also serve as an anchor for a day of dialogue between civil society and Member States on 22 September. The goal is to provide a substantive exchange with Member States on a number of key issues that civil society highlighted (including previous consultations NGLS on the same subject). These include eg systemic issues trade, finance and development, as part of human rights and mechanisms of accountability and transparency, public-private partnerships, mining and land grabbing, social, economic / environmental and climate issues of gender justice, peace and conflict. (More information about the event on 22 September will reach you in the coming weeks.)

For more information on the consultation, including detailed instructions on how to participate and resources to download, please visit: www.worldwewant2015.org/fr/ consultationSLNG . Participants with low internet network to post online their contribution can send them via email, by referring to the instructions here . Thank you for taking the time to contribute to this important discussion.

Sincerely,

NGLS

Información actualizada: realizada Consulta por un-SENG sober sober cuatro informed the agenda desarrollo Post-2015

Estimados colegas:

The contactamos para informarles of the consultation that facilitando está el Servicio de Enlace de las Naciones Unidas con las organizaciones no gubernamentales (UN-SENG) in colaboración con el Equipo de Planificación para el Desarrollo Post-2015 there Ejecutiva the Oficina del Secretario General de las Naciones Unidas, encuentra is available árabe , inglés , inglés y español . The consultation tiene como objetivo recabar análisis crítico the sociedad civil respecto shapeless cuatro sobre desarrollo the agenda later in 2015, Seran presentados al Secretario General, y han sido por publicados:

El Grupo de Alto Nivel sobre la Agenda Post-2015 (HLP plus Siglas en inglés) ;

Red de Soluciones para el Desarrollo Sostenible de las Naciones Unidas (SDSN plus Siglas en inglés) ;

El Pacto Mundial de las Naciones Unidas (UNGC plus Siglas en inglés) , y

El Grupo de Desarrollo compuesto por agencias de las Naciones Unidas (UNDG plus Siglas en inglés) . To inform incluye el preliminar, debido has informed that el final is in publicará septiembre.

SENG está el al tanto that of Ustedes algunos han confeccionado recientemente escritas respuestas y / o Comunicados de prensa el comentando informs del Grupo de Alto Nivel publicado hace dos semanas. The invitamos has copiar there pasajes relevantes pegar los más de esas comunicaciones in el espacio en línea the consultation realizada por el SENG , para su consideración oficial como parte y su inclusión the consultation in the síntesis de las contribuciones. límite La fecha para enviar contribuciones escritas addition, there are sea en inglés, español o ingles, es el 12 de julio de 2013. Debido al my Ramadán of the fecha para enviar límite contribuciones in árabe es el 1 de julio de 2013.

The consultation incluirá también una serie teleconferencias in regional árabe, inglés, inglés y español, dirigida a aumentar las analíticas contribuciones of civil sociedad del Sur. Para más información sobre las teleconferencias, por favor consult este documento .

The síntesis de las contribuciones Hara Hincapié especial en las perspectivas regional será there entregada al Secretario General of the UN, los Jefes de Estado y de Gobierno that asistan has reunión alto nivel of the Asamblea General of the UN sobre los de Desarrollo Objetivos del Milenio el 25 de septiembre de 2013, y al Grupo Abierto de Trabajo sobre los de Desarrollo Sostenible Objetivos .

The síntesis, además, será una jornada base of diálogo las organizaciones between the sociedad civil y los Gobiernos that tendrá lugar el 22 de septiembre. The jornada buscará entablar a debate between sustancial los Estados Miembros sober una serie aspectos planteados por la sociedad civil (también Consulates in relacionadas al proceso Post-2015 previamente realizadas por el SENG) y relativas, por ejemplo, al sistema de comercio internacional, el financiero sistema y el desarrollo, el marco de derechos humanos y los de cuentas Mecanismos of surrender; Colaboraciones público las-privadas; las industrias extractivas there apropiación of the tierra, justicia social, económica, y medio ambiental climática, género y, y paz Conflicting there. (En las semanas próximas is brindará más información sobre el evento del 22 de septiembre).

Para ver más información sobre la consulta, tales como detalladas instrucciones sobre cómo y fuentes Participar adicionales, por favor dirigirse has http://www.worldwewant2015. org / es / consultaSENG . Las organizaciones o individuos that no dispongan of suficiente ancho de banda Internet pueden enviar por correo electrónico respuestas addition, las instrucciones is encuentran aquí . Muchas gracias por su tiempo y por este contribuir a major debate.

Saludos cordial

UN-SENG


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